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Promoting Health Among Teens! Abstinence-Only Intervention

Study Findings

Evidence by Outcome Domain and Study

Citation Sexual Activity Number of Sexual Partners Contraceptive Use STIs or HIV Pregnancy

Jemmott et al. 2010

Uniformly positive impacts across the outcomes examined in this domain Uniformly null impacts across the outcomes examined in this domain Uniformly null impacts across the outcomes examined in this domain

Walker et al. 2016

Uniformly null impacts across the outcomes examined in this domain
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Detailed Findings

CitationDetails

Jemmott et al. 2010

The study evaluated the program with a randomized controlled trial involving middle school students in a low-income African American community in the northeastern United States. Adolescents participating in the study were randomly assigned to either a control group that received an 8-hour general health-promotion program, or to one of four treatment groups, each receiving one of the following interventions: (1) an 8-hour abstinence-only intervention; (2) an 8-hour safer sex-only intervention; (3) an 8-hour comprehensive abstinence and safer sex intervention; or (4) a 12-hour comprehensive abstinence and safer sex intervention. The study administered surveys immediately before the intervention (baseline) and at follows-ups conducted 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after baseline. The effectiveness of each intervention was assessed relative to the control group.

The study found that averaged across the five follow-up periods, adolescents assigned to the PHAT-AO group were statistically significantly less likely than those in the control group to report having had sexual intercourse in the previous three months. In addition, adolescents assigned to the PHAT-AO group who were sexually inexperienced at baseline were statistically significantly less likely to report having initiated sexual intercourse. The study found no statistically significant program impacts on the likelihood of having multiple sexual partners or unprotected intercourse in the past three months.

The study also examined program impacts on consistency of condom use. Findings for this measure were not considered for the review because they did not meet the review evidence standards. Specifically, findings were reported only for subgroups of youth defined by sexual activity at follow up.

Walker et al. 2016

A more recent study by a separate group of researchers evaluated PHAT-AO using a randomized controlled trial that involved 1,319 adolescents attending 6th and 7th grades in public schools in Yonkers, New York. Adolescents participating in the study were randomly assigned either to a treatment group that received the 8-module PHAT-AO program or a control group that received a general health curriculum, the Promoting Health Among Teens! Health Intervention. Surveys were administered before random assignment (baseline), and again three, six, and 12 months after the end of the program.

At each of the three follow-ups, the study found no evidence of statistically significant program impacts on the likelihood of ever having sex among the subgroup of adolescents who were sexually inexperienced at baseline.

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Notes

Some study entries may include more than one citation because each citation examines a different follow-up period from the same study sample, or because each citation examines a different set of outcome measures on the same study sample. A blank cell indicates the study did not examine any outcome measures within the particular outcome domain or the findings for the outcome measures within that domain did not meet the review evidence standards.

Information on evidence of effectiveness is available only for studies that received a high or moderate rating. Read the description of the review process for more information on how these programs are identified.

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