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HORIZONS

Study Findings

Evidence by Outcome Domain and Study

Citation Sexual Activity Number of Sexual Partners Contraceptive Use STIs or HIV Pregnancy

DiClemente et al. 2009

Sales et al. 2012

Uniformly positive impacts across the outcomes examined in this domain A mix of positive, null, and/or adverse impacts across the outcomes examined in this domain

Latham et al. 2010

n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a.

DiClemente et al. 2014

Steiner et al. 2014

Uniformly null impacts across the outcomes examined in this domain Uniformly positive impacts across the outcomes examined in this domain A mix of positive, null, and/or adverse impacts across the outcomes examined in this domain
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Detailed Findings

CitationDetails

DiClemente et al. 2009

Sales et al. 2012

The program’s evidence of effectiveness was first established in a randomized controlled trial involving sexually active African American females recruited from three health clinics in Atlanta, Georgia. Participants were randomly assigned either to a treatment group that received the HORIZONS program or to a control group that received the current standard of care, consisting of a one-hour STD/HIV prevention group session. Surveys were administered before the program began (baseline) and at six and 12 months after completion of the program. Data collection also included testing for chlamydia, gonorrhea, and trichomonas.

The study found that both 12 months after the program ended, and when averaging data across the two follow-up periods, youth participating in the program reported a significantly higher proportion of condom-protected sex acts, and were significantly more likely to report consistent condom use and condom use at their last sexual encounter. The study also found that youth in the treatment group were significantly less likely to test positive for chlamydia 12 months after the program ended. The study found no statistically significant impacts on gonorrhea or trichomonas infection. For the 6-month follow-up survey, the study found that youth participating in the program reported a significantly higher proportion of condom-protected sex acts in the 14 days and 60 days preceding the survey. The study found no statistically significant impacts on consistent condom use or condom use at last sexual encounter.

The study also examined program impacts on measures of STD/HIV knowledge, condom self-efficacy, partner communication, and frequency of douching. Findings for these outcomes were not considered for the review because they fell outside the scope of the review.

Latham et al. 2010

This study did not meet the review screening criteria.

DiClemente et al. 2014

Steiner et al. 2014

This study used a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of an implementation strategy used to deliver the HORIZONS program. The study was conducted with sexually active African American females recruited from three health clinics in Atlanta, Georgia. About half the study participants were randomly assigned to a treatment group that was offered telephone-based counseling every 8 weeks for 36 months after the end of the HORIZONS program. Participants assigned to the control group also received follow-up phone calls after the end of the HORIZONS program, but the content of their calls was limited to general health promotion. Because participants in both research groups received the HORIZONS program, the study does not provide evidence on the overall effectiveness of the program. Rather, the study provides evidence on an implementation strategy used to deliver the program. Surveys were administered before the program began (baseline) and at 6, 12, 18, 24, and 36 months after the HORIZONS program ended. At each assessment, participants also provided self-collected vaginal swab specimens for STI testing.

The study found that averaged across all follow-up periods, participants offered the PMI were significantly less likely to test positive for chlamydia than those who received follow-up calls covering only general health promotion. The study also found that participants in the PMI group reported a significantly higher proportion of condom-protected sex acts in the last six months and the last 90 days. The study found no statistically significant impact on the number of sexual partners in the previous six months or in the risk of gonococcal infection. The study also examined program impact on episodes of sex while high on drugs and/or alcohol. Findings for this outcome were not considered for the review because they fell outside the scope of the review.

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Notes

Some study entries may include more than one citation because each citation examines a different follow-up period from the same study sample, or because each citation examines a different set of outcome measures on the same study sample. A blank cell indicates the study did not examine any outcome measures within the particular outcome domain or the findings for the outcome measures within that domain did not meet the review evidence standards.

Information on evidence of effectiveness is available only for studies that received a high or moderate rating. Read the description of the review process for more information on how these programs are identified.

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